Flatiron Firepit
Flatiron Firepit
Flatiron Firepit
Flatiron Firepit
Flatiron Firepit
Flatiron Firepit
Flatiron Firepit
Flatiron Firepit
Flatiron Firepit
Flatiron Firepit

Flatiron Firepit

Regular price $1,295.00 Sale price $1,195.00
Unit price  per 

It's simple - a firepit you can cook on. Bring family and friends around the Flatiron to grill hamburgers, sear steaks, fry some bacon and eggs, warm your coffee and hot chocolate, toast s'mores, or just sit back and enjoy the fire - this is the firepit to gather around.

Made of solid steel in Alabama. Built to last. Now in early production.

Size

Overall Dimensions: 37" x 37" x 15 1/4"

  • Plancha griddle surface is 30 inches in diameter
  • Center grill is 15 inches in diameter
  • Shelf extends 3.5 inches from the griddle
  • Cooking surface is 16 inches off the ground

The Flatiron Firepit weighs 120 lbs.

 

Features

Plancha griddle – the grill top is a removable 30-inch flat top, drawing from the concept of the plancha grill that originated in Central America (“plancha is Spanish for “metal plate”) with heat concentrated in the center and cooler on the edges, giving you a temperature variance for cooking at different temperatures.

Center grill – in the center of the plancha is a 15” laser cut center grate which allows for grilling over an open flame.  Both the plancha and the center grill are beef tallow seasoned.

Adjustable vent – the bottom of the firepit chamber is surrounded by an adjustable vent which can be opened or closed with a sliding handle to control air flow.  Open the vent for more air flow, so your fire burns faster and generates more heat.  Close the vent to slow the burn and maintain the coals longer.

Tallow seasoned finish – seasoned with Shipley Farms beef tallow bonded to the metal cooktop using the time-honored seasoning process for cast iron and carbon steel cooking utensils.  The seasoning process will continue gradually over time as you continue to use the grill, and as that patina develops, you’ll see your cooktop blacken into a smooth satin black finish.  It can be easily scraped clean and re-seasoned. 

Tips for Cooking On & Maintaining Your Flatiron

The Flatiron is a durable and low maintenance cooking tool.  Follow these simple tips to preserve the Flatiron and create the best cooking results:

  • Don’t put food on a cool surface - The most important thing about successful cooking on steel is to always start with a hot surface before putting any food on it.  If the metal isn’t hot enough, many foods will stick to the metal surface.  Once it gets hot, food will sear and release from the metal.  Done right, the more you use the Flatiron, the more the nonstick seasoning coating will build up.
  • First time cooking – the Flatiron is pre-seasoned and lightly oiled at the factory, so it is ready to cook, just wash the surface with a little water and mild dish soap and then rinse and wipe dry before your first use.  Apply a light coat of your favorite cooking oil (butter, tallow, lard, or any vegetable oil), let it get hot, and start cooking!
  • Cleaning – Cleaning your Flatiron is easy – when you’re done cooking and while the cook top is still hot, spread about 1 cup of water across the surface, and use a flat scraper or spatula to gently scrape any leftover scraps and debris right into the fire.  Use water to loosen any tough burnt on spots.  The seasoning layer is fairly tough so light scraping won’t take it off.  When clean, spread a very thin layer of cooking oil over the surface, which will protect the metal and also contribute to the next layer of seasoning next time you cook.  You can also research tips for cleaning and caring for cast iron or carbon steel pans online for additional tips on care and cleaning.
  • Re-seasoning – Over time your seasoning layer should build, however, if the cooktop gets overheated or you have to scrape too hard to get some burnt on food off, it’s possible the seasoning layer could come off.  If that happens, you can start the seasoning process over.  First clean the metal back to a clean, dry surface – clean, brush, or scrape until it’s clean, flat and smooth, and there’s no residue remaining.  It’s steel, so you really can’t hurt it.  Coat with a very thin layer of oil, and heat it up.  You’ll notice a bit of smoke from the oil as it heats up, and it should take about 15 minutes once it reaches about 400 degrees for the seasoning layer to cure – it’s ready when the oil stops smoking.  You can also add to the seasoning layer using the very same process.
    This guide at SeriousEats.com has some helpful information about seasoning.
  • Cooking Oils – Almost any animal or plant-based fat or oil should work for seasoning, though some are better than others.  We of course are partial to beef tallow, and grapeseed oil or canola oil also work well.  Avoid olive oil, flaxseed oil, butter, and shortening, as they tend not to work as well.
  • Never leave it wet – Water is the main enemy of steel.  The layer of seasoning will protect the steel from water during cooking and cleaning, but water or moisture left to stand on the surface can cause rust over time.  It’s best to keep the cooktop surface covered after it cools when not in use.  If any rust spots do develop, scrape or clean with a wire brush and follow the re-seasoning process above.  Once clean, it is safe to cook on immediately, as long as you use some cooking oil and get the metal hot first, the cooking process itself will season the metal, just be sure to get a thin layer of oil over the entire surface.